Tag Archives: cbc Ideas

Escape Your [Filter] Bubble 10/10

We’re mesmerized by our phones.  It’s  like having a little television set that we can pull out of our pockets, and check into the many dramas unfolding around us whenever we are otherwise unoccupied.

santeri-viinamaki-smartphone-dating-app
Shared by Santeri Viinamaki CC BY-SA 2.0

Every time we open an app, our content – the information that reaches our eyes – is being controlled by someone else, often with popularity and newness as a priority over diversity and quality (Hossein Darekhshan, Ideas podcast)

On TIDE podcast episode 72, Doug Belshaw and Dai Barnes discuss how the  digital divide has become a digital literacy divide.

Over and over again we hear that most people on social media don’t understand that they are “liking” and “sharing” inside a “walled-garden”, and they are paying corporations for the use of that space by handing over their privacy, and their attention, to specific ads and information directed at people in their bubble.

Brodie Fenton gives and excellent example of this, where a friend suggests that the posts CBC News puts on Facebook are more interesting than the ones they post on their website. This friend is completely unaware that it is the Facebook algorithm controlling her feed, not CBC posting specific content on her site.

It follows, then, that before we can escape our bubbles, we need to

a) realize how we are being targeted inside mobile apps like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

b) have a desire to leave the comfort and beautifully designed experience of existing within apps

Once we have chosen to diversify our feed, how do we do it?

Here are some suggestions I have encountered this week.  Please feel free to comment with more ideas.

  1. Fool the algorithm.  Diversify your feed by randomly liking and sharing (Hossein Derakshan)
  2. Insist on open algorithms.  Insist on the right to modify our own personal algorithms.
  3. Commit to reading and consuming more content through your browser (online newspapers, blogs, podcasts) to expose yourself to more diverse ideas.
  4. Purposely follow people on social media who are nothing like you.
  5. Read one or two entire articles daily and reflect on them, perhaps even sharing back in your own blog.
  6. Become digitally literate.
  7. Become domain literate.
  8. Ensure our children develop digital literacies.

Most importantly, model  the importance of diversity and truth on the open web.  Our democracy depends on it.

 

Featured image by Mazime Bhm on Unsplash

All of the posts in this series can be found here:

3/10 – How the “smart phone” and mobile apps have changed the way we interact online

4/10 – Historical perspective – the co-created open web to corporately owned platforms

5/10 – Algorithms: What’s controlling what you see and read?

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

7/10 – Videos and Images – From Facts to Feelings

8/10 – Popularity over Importance: Celebrity culture in a time of wicked world problems

9/10 – The Attention Economy

 

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

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A caution about this post: I am a learner, not an expert.  

I have set out here to use my #10posts10days  (#10days10posts) challenge to explore this area that deeply interests me, in an open way that lets others see what I am learning.  If you know more than I do, please correct me if necessary, and share! If you have more questions, please post those in the comments too.  Let’s learn more together.

All of the posts in this series can be found here: You Live in a Bubble

Popular, or Important? 8/10

People LIKE fake news better.

buzzfeed-fake-news-wins
from Buzzfeed: https://www.buzzfeed.com/craigsilverman/viral-fake-election-news-outperformed-real-news-on-facebook?utm_term=.uuYnWnaKn5#.kddEBEnzEM

It’s hard to argue with that.  And if you are going to click and share it, Facebook is feeding you even more of it, because as long as you are sharing and liking it, they are making money.

With the invention of the cell phone, we have left behind the open web of democratized text, for the convenience and preferred design of mobile apps.  Our phones have become our televisions. We open apps to read our feed, and if we like what we see, we can share it or make our “like” known.  And someone gets paid for that!

But if not enough people “like” it, something more popular will replace it.

The internet has become popularity-driven.  If you write something that not many people are interested in, it is very challenging to get eyes on it.  (Hossein Derakhshan ~ 9:55)  If your work isn’t popular, it’s essentially invisible.

In the open web, you move from site to site through hyperlinks, seeing and learning a variety of things while you are there.  Apps, on the other hand, confine you to one site.

Our apps determine how, when and where we are accessing information – as well as what information we can view.

A further shift to images and video, means we are watching online instead of reading online.  When we are reading, we are thinking. When we are engaging in video and images, we are invoking feelings and emotions, which means that in online environments, we are focusing on feeling over truth, and emotion over thinking (Hossein Derakhshan).

According to Henry Giroux, ‘celebrity culture’ in the US “dumbs down culture and collapses the distinction between serious and frivolous ideas”.  Celebrity culture fills people with nonsense.  The flow of money – the flurry of clicks – replaces the flow of thoughtfulness.

Popularity is monetized. Entertainment is more important than thinking.

And we are seeing the result of new reality on a global scale.

 

All of the posts in this series can be found here:

3/10 – How the “smart phone” and mobile apps have changed the way we interact online

4/10 – Historical perspective – the co-created open web to corporately owned platforms

5/10 – Algorithms: What’s controlling what you see and read?

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

7/10 – Videos and Images – From Facts to Feelings

9/10 – The Attention Economy

10/10 – Escape Your [Filter] Bubble

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Featured image by Noah Hinton on Unsplash

Resources:

Canadaland: People Like Fake News Better

Buzzfeed: How Macedonian Spammers Are Using Facebook Groups To Feed You Fake News

CBC Ideas: Screened Off – The Dangers of an Insular Web

The Truth of Post-Truth

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This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

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A caution about this post: I am a learner, not an expert.  

I have set out here to use my #10posts10days  (#10days10posts) challenge to explore this area that deeply interests me, in an open way that lets others see what I am learning.  If you know more than I do, please correct me if necessary, and share! If you have more questions, please post those in the comments too.  Let’s learn more together.

All of the posts in this series can be found here: You Live in a Bubble

 

 

 

 

A World of Feelings, Not Facts 7/10

In our online world, increasingly dominated by social media, feelings are more important than facts.

This is the assertion of Hossein Derakhshan, an idea that I first encountered on Screened Off: The Dangers of the Insular Web.

As an online teacher, I always considered video to be an excellent tool to engage learners.  But do we understand how this engagement impacts learning and thinking?

Streaming video was enabled with the spread of high-speed internet, and more often now, we consume this emotion-driven form of content over text.  This makes the Internet far more like watching television than reading a book or an article.

Increasingly,  our online time is spent inside apps, not on the open web.  According to Hossein Derakhshan, a blogger and writer based in Iran,

“Like TV it now increasingly entertains us, and even more so than television it amplifies our existing beliefs and habits. It makes us feel more than think, and it comforts more than challenges. The result is a deeply fragmented society, driven by emotions, and radicalized by lack of contact and challenge from outside. This is why Oxford Dictionaries designated “post-truth” as the word of 2016: an adjective “relating to circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than emotional appeals.””

Subject matter that we consume inside apps, like Facebook, entertains us.  Corporate owners design these spaces to keep us there, because the longer we stay, the more money they make.  Negativity does not encourage engagement, so we are presented with “feel good” content.

Instead of engaging in dialog around important social issues, and reading text, where “facts” can be challenged, more and more, we choose to spend our time in the comfort of our apps, accepting the diet of targeted, advertisement-driven mush, fed to us by the algorithm that controls our content.

Watching video (television) instead of reading text means that we become victims of those who have mastered this one-way, emotion driven form of media, and we become passive consumers of those who grab our attention instead of citizens engaged in discourse around facts.

How does this impact our understanding of our world?

derakhshan-on-tv-online
CBC Ideas Podcast: Screened Off: The Dangers of the Insular Web http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/screened-off-the-dangers-of-an-insular-web-1.3937638

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Featured image shared by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash

All of the posts in this series can be found here:

3/10 – How the “smart phone” and mobile apps have changed the way we interact online

4/10 – Historical perspective – the co-created open web to corporately owned platforms

5/10 – Algorithms: What’s controlling what you see and read?

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

8/10 – Popularity over Importance: Celebrity culture in a time of wicked world problems

9/10 – The Attention Economy

10/10 – Escape Your [Filter] Bubble

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

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A caution about this post: I am a learner, not an expert.  

I have set out here to use my #10posts10days  (#10days10posts) challenge to explore this area that deeply interests me, in an open way that lets others see what I am learning.  If you know more than I do, please correct me if necessary, and share! If you have more questions, please post those in the comments too.  Let’s learn more together.

All of the posts in this series can be found here: You Live in a Bubble

 

Text vs. World Trumps

Who’s Controlling Your World? 5/10

According to former Wikimedia Executive Director, Sue Gardner, we spend three hours each day inside our mobile apps, for every hour we spend on the open web (CBC Ideas, Jan 16, 2017).

While in many of those apps, what we are exposed to is largely controlled by algorithms.  Our feeds are “personalized”, based on our previous behaviour in the app.

A friend of mine recently shared that she “liked” something on Facebook that was posted by one of her daughter’s friends, and suddenly, her own feed was populated by all kinds of content targeted for gay women.  The daughter’s friend openly identifies on Facebook as a Lesbian.

My husband often complains to me that he misses pictures of his granddaughter that I see on Facebook, even though we both “friends” with her parents.

Just because you follow someone, doesn’t mean you will see everything they post. What you do see, is controlled by an algorithm that selects your content based on your past activity. A few months ago, Facebook fired its human editors in favour of more algorithm-determined content.

In the CBC Ideas podcast, Sue Gardner, describes what happens when she creates a fake Facebook identity as a Trump supporter – how a feed full of fake news targeting Hilary Clinton suddenly appeared (36:54 here).

facebook-by-bill-ferriter
Shared by Bill Ferriter CC By-NC 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/plugusin/15147354484/

The goal of an app is to keep you in there, so that you can be tracked, and fed a diet of personalized advertising.  The longer you are there, the more information the app has about your interests, and the algorithm can then feed you the very things that you like – enticing you to stay longer and create more advertising revenue.

Like Brodie Fenton says, “Aleppo doesn’t share well” (unless it is packaged as an image of a child that entices clicks).  On the apps, world news looks exactly like cat videos, pictures of our “friends”,  and advertising, and the platforms are set up to discourage further exploration, handing you the simple like/share buttons to touch on your phone before you move on.

What are the social consequences of seeing only what you like, and what you enjoy?

Human curators can make mistakes, if they don’t have good judgement. But human curators can also explain their choices and actions.

Algorithms are secret, can’t be held responsible, can change without notice, and filter based on discriminatory practices.

This is censorship on a grand scale.

Kin Lane, in the Tech Gypsies Podcast episode below, pulled out this quote:

“And Facebook is just one player in complex ecology of algorithmically-supplemented determinations with little external monitoring to see how decisions are made or what the effects might be.”

Kate Crawford and Meredith Whittaker

According to Hossein Derakhshan,  right now, algorithms are determining “who we date, what we eat, where we shop, what we see, what we buy” without oversight.

He argues that the algorithms should be both viewable and customizable by us.

What if, instead of popularity and newness, we valued diversity and quality?

How would that change the experience of so many people for hours every day?  How might that impact thinking and behaviour both inside and outside the corporately controlled digital environments we enter into so willingly?

Facebook is a “technology” company, and therefore is not subject to the same restrictions as a “media” company.

Is government involvement needed in digital environments to ensure democratic values are upheld online?

Featured image by ApolitikNow CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

All of the posts in this series can be found here:

3/10 – How the “smart phone” and mobile apps have changed the way we interact online

4/10 – Historical perspective – the co-created open web to corporately owned platforms

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

7/10 – Videos and Images – From Facts to Feelings

8/10 – Popularity over Importance: Celebrity culture in a time of wicked world problems

9/10 – The Attention Economy

10/10 – Escape Your [Filter] Bubble

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This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A caution about this post: I am a learner, not an expert.  

I have set out here to use my #10posts10days  (#10days10posts) challenge to explore this area that deeply interests me, in an open way that lets others see what I am learning.  If you know more than I do, please correct me if necessary, and share! If you have more questions, please post those in the comments too.  Let’s learn more together.

All of the posts in this series can be found here: You Live in a Bubble

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From A Level Playing Field to a Few Empires: What Happened to the Web? 4/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

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A caution as you read this: I am a learner, not an expert.  

I have set out here to use my #10posts10days  (#10days10posts) challenge to explore this area that deeply interests me, in an open way that lets others see what I am learning.  If you know more than I do, please correct me if necessary, and share! If you have more questions, please post those in the comments too.  Let’s learn more together.

All of the posts in this series can be found here: You Live in a Bubble

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The first timetable I was assigned as a new secondary school teacher was 3 sections of DIC2A/2G: Introduction to Computers.  It was all about DOS, binary numbers, file storage and hacking – before the excitement around Windows GUI – and I spent more time fixing the network than I did teaching!  But it was a popular course, and we recommended it to students.  Computers were new, but we seemed to understand that learning about them was important.

PET personal computer
Wikimedia

A few years later, in the mid-1990’s, when the “Internet” arrived for most users, we taught most kids to craft websites using HTML code.

Anyone could make a website to share information, and the we saw the Internet as a place that gave people voices.

netscape-navigator-by-kurazaybo-martinez-cabal
Shared by Kurazaybo Martinez Cabellaro CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Early users accessed the web and created HTML pages through Netscape, but that all changed with the release of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, the first “monopoly” on the web. By 2002, 95% of online computer users were accessing the Web through this browser, but only 11% of the world’s population was online.  As it lost the “browser wars” with IE, Netscape opened-sourced its code and Mozilla was born.

According to Mark Surman, CEO of Mozilla, developers were essentially able to maintain free access to the web by ensuring free alternatives were available.

Today, though, this has shifted.  Essentially four companies – Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Google – control the internet, making it next to impossible to compete, or to be heard online, if you don’t fit the monetization strategies of the tech giants.

In a world where nearly 50% of the world’s population is online, yet many users think Facebook IS the Internet,  how do we get back to an online world where all users have a voice?

From CBC Ideas: Screened Off – The Dangers of the Insular Web

“If you’re going to engage the modern world, you’re going to use the internet the way tech companies are making it for you. And you’re going to benefit from it in a bunch of ways. But you’re not really exercising a completely free choice.”
Tech thinker Sue Gardner

Tomorrow, we’ll look at how the tech giants use algorithms to control what you see online.

Featured image from Wikimedia

All of the posts in this series can be found here:

3/10 – How the “smart phone” and mobile apps have changed the way we interact online

5/10 – Algorithms: What’s controlling what you see and read?

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

7/10 – Videos and Images – From Facts to Feelings

8/10 – Popularity over Importance: Celebrity culture in a time of wicked world problems

9/10 – The Attention Economy

10/10 – Escape Your [Filter] Bubble

Your Smart Phone Changed Everything 3/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

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A caution as you read this: I am a learner, not an expert.  

I have set out here to use my #10posts10days challenge to explore this area that deeply interests me, in an open way that lets others see what I am learning.  If you know more than I do, please correct me if necessary, and share! If you have more questions, please post those in the comments too.  Let’s learn more together.

All of the posts in this series can be found here: You Live in a Bubble

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It’s been 10 years since Steve Jobs first announced the invention of the iPhone.  Prior to 2007, how did you access information online?

Over the past decade, we have gone from primarily desktop and laptop access, to using our phones for most of our online activity.

This has profoundly changed when, where and how we access the web.

iphone-by-gerry
Image shared by Gerry CC BY 2.0

As you look around and see friends, family, and co-workers busy on their phones, consider how much of that time is being spent INSIDE Apps?

Why is that important?

At one time, the web was a place that was democratizing voices – allowing people to write, publish, communicate – without all the barriers to publication that were there for print media.  But as we moved inside the “walled gardens”, and changed our access patterns so that we existed online inside apps that tracked us, and fed us only what we wanted, some of the best content stopped reaching us.

Hossein Derakhshan, on CBC Ideas (9:20)

“I would describe the change in one simple argument, that the internet used to be like books, but now it’s like television.  That entails that a few elements, a few core elements and features of the internet and web, pre- the emergence of social media have also changed, so decentralization, non-linearity, it’s much less diverse now, and it’s become quite popularity driven, in a way.  If you write something that not many people support somehow, then it’s very likely that it wouldn’t be visible to very many people, even the people who are following you, and that’s a very key difference here.  Now, when you follow someone, let’s say on Twitter or Facebook, you don’t even see all their posts. That’s a huge change. You only get to see the ones the algorithms decide you should see, based on your previous engagements, based on the topics, and based on the amount of engagement they have attracted, likes and reshares, retweets and all that.”

He goes on to say that Web 2.0 has “transformed into social networks”, something which is now dominating in essentially every country.  This is probably even more predominant in developing countries where up to 50% of the people can think that the internet IS Facebook.

Apps have created convenience for us.  By spending time inside these corporately-owned spaces, we trade our privacy for that convenience.  According to Kin Lane, people who really understand the web are using this information to sort us into “comfortable little groups” so they can sell things to us.

So what basic understanding do we need to see what is happening to us based on our digital habits? To begin with, we need to understand what domains are, and who is behind them.  Domain Literacy, defined here by Kin Lane, is an important digital literacy.  Without this understanding, we are left to behave in our bubbles just as the app owners direct us to.

From Kin Lane:

“Increasingly startups are building tools to separate, segment, and personalize the web for “you”, leaving out all the bits about where you exist only in their sales funnel. They have a single focus, to identify you, target you, and put you into a bucket where they can monitor, track, and sell you things, on the way to their business exit (cha-ching).”

Tomorrow, I will take a closer look at the history of how our behaviour online has changed so much over the past 10-20 years.  In the meantime, I recommend the references below if you want to pursue this idea further.

Featured image by Frank McKenna on Unsplash

All of the posts in this series can be found here:

4/10 – Historical perspective – the co-created open web to corporately owned platforms

5/10 – Algorithms: What’s controlling what you see and read?

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

7/10 – Videos and Images – From Facts to Feelings

8/10 – Popularity over Importance: Celebrity culture in a time of wicked world problems

9/10 – The Attention Economy

10/10 – Escape Your [Filter] Bubble

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Resources

Hacking the Attention Economy by danah boyd

Why America is Self-Segregating by danah boyd

The Social Bubbles we Experienced During Election is the Future of the Web by Kin Lane

Screened Off – The Dangers of the Insular Web – CBC Ideas Podcast

Post-Truth Fact Check – Canadaland Podcast

Facebook Dismissive of Censorship and Abuse Concerns

Iran’s blogfather: Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are killing the web – Hossein Derakhshan

Millions of Facebook users have no idea they’re using the internet

You Live in a Bubble – A Filter Bubble 2/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 

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In this year’s 10 posts in 10 days challenge, I wanted to find a theme for my posts. It had to be something I needed to explore more deeply, but I also wanted to present the ideas as an organized curation to better help others approach a topic that might be new to them.

In 2016, I was intrigued by how Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano offered her readers a structure to learn from her thinking.  By providing an advance organizer, she linked her ideas together in a way that helped her readers navigate through the topic in a meaningful way.

Recently, the idea that we live in an information filter bubble, and that these “bubbles” are part of massive social change, has entered into conversations on multiple platforms.  I want to learn more about how we came to this place, and the strategies and habits we need to intentionally escape from those bubbles.

I am planning the following posts, and I will link back to them here  (this is my initial thinking, so as I learn more, the topics might shift).

3/10 – How the “smart phone” and mobile apps have changed the way we interact online

4/10 – Historical perspective – the co-created open web to corporately owned platforms

5/10 – Algorithms: What’s controlling what you see and read?

6/10 – Information Literacy: What will your lesson plan look like now?

7/10 – Videos and Images – From Facts to Feelings

8/10 – Popularity over Importance: Celebrity culture in a time of wicked world problems

9/10 – The Attention Economy

10/10 – Escape Your [Filter] Bubble

 

I welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions as I learn more about who has the power in our interconnected, yet insular, digital world.

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Some initial resources:

CBC Ideas: The Insular Web

Tech Gypsies Podcast (caution – adult language)

Danah Boyd – Why America is Self-Segregating

 

 

Featured image by Califmom, shared under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.

The Key to Innovative Practice? More Ideas!

For a long time in Ontario, we have relied heavily on standardized test results, and the tested ideas and strategies grounded in research to inform our educational practice.

But does this kind of thinking short-change our kids?

Dr. Chris Dede talks about the importance of spreading pockets of excellence and adapting successful practice into our context.

In “Great to Excellent: Launching the Next Stage of Ontario’s Education Agenda“, Michael Fullan stated (p. 12)

“What Ontario educators and leaders have accomplished in the last nine years is truly remarkable and impressive on a world scale. Yet it is also disturbingly precarious without the focused innovation required for excellence.”

How do we accelerate the use of innovative practices in our classrooms?

In Eureka! Mapping the Creative Mind,  we learn that one of the best ways to have a great idea is to have lots of them (Linus Pauling).

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 1.08.15 AM
Shared under a Creative Commons attribution license by Celestine Chua

 

Chris Anderson argues that Crowd Accelerated Innovation results from our ability to access a global community of ideas online.  “Radical openness” works to spread ideas.  Innovation emerges as groups of people “bump up” the best ideas.

Our reality is that we are part of a global community.

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 12.35.07 AM

The role of a teacher is to ensure that ever single child in the classroom is learning.  Teachers are researchers, searching for the best practices to meet the learning needs of each child.  Focused, disciplined innovation results from modifying and adapting strategies and ideas that have been successful in other contexts.

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 12.50.24 AM

Isn’t it important, then, that all teachers know how to effectively access, and contribute to, the global community of ideas?

Digital Literacy: What Are We Avoiding?

The original blog post begins below the solid line. I have added a number of updates here at the top of the page. You will need to read the original post first to understand the significance of the updates.

Thank you for taking the time to engage in this post.

 

Update November 2015: Here is the link to the July 14 CBC Ontario Today podcast: Is Porn Messing with the Teenaged Brian?

MediaSmarts Resource: Talking to your kids about pornography

Update December 2015: Here is the latest video from the #DearDaddy campaign.  Please protect our girls!

 

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This is a blog post I have been trying to write for over a month.

It is a sensitive subject, but it is a subject we need to talk about.  By avoiding finishing and publishing this post, I am modelling the very behaviour that I want to draw attention to: avoiding this topic.

Over the last few years as a school leader, I have been appalled at some of the examples of how young men treat the young women at school.  It puzzled me, because I really thought that equality for women had really become the norm.  But more and more, incidents involving the public disrespecting of young women came to my attention.

It wasn’t until I listened to this podcast that I began to have a better understanding of what I might be witnessing:

keyboard in the dark faungg’s photo via Compfight

Generation Porn (caution: explicit material)

“Thirty years ago, a peek at a Playboy centrefold was a rite of passage for teenage boys. Today kids as young as ten can view pornography on smart phones. Hassan Ghedi Santur explores the long-term consequences of this burgeoning exposure to pornography.”

 


Porn is more accessible than it has ever been before.

Porn is no longer just the images from Penthouse and Playboy.  It is violent, degrading, and geared (by the industry) to “tap into the core, basic engines of male sexual arousal”.

cell phone in dark

cc radiant guy via Compfight cc

What do we know?

1) We know that young boys are accessing it.  Anyone with a cell phone can watch porn.

2) There is some research to suggest that porn is dopamine producing and therefore addictive.  Thousands of young men claim to be suffering from or recovering from “porn addiction“, which can lead to depression, anxiety, and sexual disfunction.

3) According to sociologist Gail Dines:  “If you are 11 or 12, you have no repertoire of sexual behaviour to draw on.  So when you go into You Porn or Porn Hub and you see this violent dehumanizing debasing pornography, you can’t say, “You know what, I’ve been with women and they don’t like this, and this isn’t what I want to do.”  You’ve got nothing to draw upon.  This becomes the only thing you have ever seen to define who you are sexually.  That, is great business practice because the earlier you shape the sexual template of a boy, the longer you’ve got him for life”

We do good work in Ontario schools, teaching students to be critical thinkers and to look at how our thinking is influenced by media.

Are we doing a good job of teaching our young people about the real concerns around accessing violent, degrading pornography on a regular basis?