Tag Archives: digital leadership

Open Education Leadership

Should education leaders work openly?

Is knowledge more rapidly mobilized through the system when leaders work openly?

For the purposes of my work, I am considering personal professional openness – the concept of sharing thinking and learning in open spaces, curating resources for others, engaging in open conversations in text or through broadcast technologies like podcasts, videos and YouTube Live, blogging and commenting on blogs, and participating across the educational boundaries in wider conversations across the web.

“Working open” means different things in different contexts.  Doug Belshaw has summarized the idea of working open in education here.

He provides this question, that is an excellent starting point for opening our work to others:

We should be continually asking the question, “can we make this public?” If that seems too radical, then a smaller step might be the question, “is there any reason why this shouldn’t be shared with everyone at the organisation?”

 

Here is a summary of what I learned this week.  The full story is below.

Working openly is a new skill, with unlimited potential for mobilizing knowledge within the education system.  We (as a system) don’t yet value it as a critical leadership skill for education.

“You are never going to be able to shortcut doing the hard work of changing hearts and mind, and the hook which gets people to realize that working openly is useful, is going to be different in every situation”. (Doug Belshaw)

When, as a  leader, you work openly, you allow others to “swim in the river you are swimming in”, not your river, but the one you are swimming in right now. (Dai Barnes)

Open practices are on a continuum, and are dependent on context. Developing digital literacies helps leaders understand what should be shared openly, but also what should be shared behind a password, and what should be private.

Senior Leaders need to be conscious of their position when blogging, but sharing their learning  minimizes the disconnect between leadership thinking and classroom practice.

Once Senior Leaders believe that open practice is worth pursuing, we need a scaffolded approach to help develop an understanding of digital literacies and support in developing that open practice.

Open practice by senior leaders encourages the participation of the entire learning community, and helps all stakeholders in public education find their voice.

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The full story:

Since beginning my work with #mathleadersNEO the Mathematics Leadership Network, I have been exploring this thinking – how open practice can impact the work of education leaders, particularly in influencing classroom practice and improving student learning.

Recently, I listened to the TIDE Podcast #61: Open to Suggestion, screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-10-59-12-pmwhich got me thinking again about the value in working openly as an education leaders.

 

 

I hoped that Doug Belshaw and Dai Barnes might explore it in more detail, so I posted this suggestion on their Slack Channel:

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I was so pleased to see that in TIDE Episode #70, the answer to this question was discussed, and some ideas completely new to me surfaced in the conversation.

I have posted the sections of the podcast to help provide focus for the thinking.  Please take a few minutes to listen to the sound clips that are much more explicit than my summaries below.

The Importance of Content – Choosing Words Carefully

 

Dai began by talking about the role of an education leader and how conscious a leader needs to be about that role and position, and the ‘weight’ of the words they might make public.

Understanding what can and should be shared openly is a digital literacy, and it takes time to build.  Experiencing the value of reaching an audience this way, and leveraging it to achieve organizational goals, also takes time to develop.

It is difficult to access education leaders.  When they make their thinking and learning visible through blogging and other social media interactions, everyone in the organization (and the community) has access to what they are learning.

Sharing Resources Openly (Instead of Through Email)

Instead of sharing resources with specific educators in email, leaders can share them in an open space (such as a blog or website) so that all educators, within the system and world wide, have access to those resources. It also allows others to then comment on how they use the resources in classroom practice, to add other similar resources to the list, and to have a conversation in the comments around the specific learning goals best supported through these resources.

 

What are the Barriers to Sharing Openly?

 

We have to understand what can (and should) be shared fully openly, what should be shared behind a password, and what should be private.  As well, we need to learn how to do that sharing so that nobody is personally or professionally impacted in a negative way.

For example, sharing a screencast on how to copy a Google Doc might be valuable to many educators.  What we wouldn’t say, is, “I know many educators in my school are struggling with this, so I have made this instructional screencast to help you”.

We might say instead, “Are you trying to copy a Google Doc? Here are some simple instructions to walk you through the process”.  This statement makes the learning open to all without any suggestion that the skill is one specific people find difficult.

It’s new learning.  It’s 2016 learning. And you don’t know what you don’t know. For so many educators, the way they have always done things has served them well and they don’t see the need for change in practice.

 

What New Leadership Qualities do we Value in 2016?

 

When, as a  leader, you work openly, you allow others to “swim in the river you are swimming in”, not your river, but the one you are swimming in right now.

Dai is playing with an important concept here, I think.

There are certain qualities and strengths of education leaders that we have traditionally valued, and we look for these.

But working openly is a new skill, with unlimited potential for mobilizing knowledge within the education system.  We don’t yet value it in the education system.

 

Open Practices: Changing Hearts and Minds

 

There is no such thing as open practice.  It is open practices (plural) because it is always within the context of where the learning is happening.

“You are never going to be able to shortcut doing the hard work of changing hearts and mind, and the hook which gets people to realize that working openly is useful, is going to be different in every situation”.

Who can you influence to practice more openly today?

What small steps can each leader take to work more openly?

 

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Here are some of the long term questions I am trying to answer:

How can Superintendents ensure that knowledge and understanding of high-yield instructional practices reaches the level of the student desk?

Does the exchange of ideas in open networks, across the boundaries of school districts, and even countries, more quickly impact change in classroom practice?

Can open leadership practices by system leaders enhance knowledge mobilization and improved classroom instruction, thereby increasing student learning and achievement?

Can technology help system leaders get new learning into classrooms?

 

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Please also see our work with Stephen Downes here.

The Importance of Working Open by Doug Belshaw

Featured image shared by ThinkPublic CC-BY-SA-2.0

#GAFESUMMIT #ONTARIO Slides

Last weekend I had the privilege of sharing learning at the Ontario GAFE Summit in Kitchener.  I presented with Mark Carbone, CIO, Waterloo Region District School Board.  I have embedded our slides below.  These are presentation slides so there is not a lot of content.

However, I think you will find the links and resources useful.

We will post our slides from this weekend’s GAFE Summit in Thunder Bay after the event ends on Sunday.

Please be sure to check out these three key OSAPAC Resources:

  1. Digital Citizenship Resources for Educators
  2. Digital Leadership Resources for Principals
  3. Digital Leadership Support for Education Leaders

 

Why Should Educators Understand Social Media?

Educators must understand social media, because this is where our children are:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/common-sense-media-report-reveals-new-facts-about-kids-use-of-technology-social-media/

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Is shutting down the device the answer?

Do our kids, and our teachers, understand how powerful social media can be for LEARNING?

Isn’t it ESSENTIAL for our school and system leaders to be fully digitally literate?

Here is a great guide to digital life for teens.

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This Guide to Life Online is Produced by http://mediasmarts.ca/ and available free by clicking on the image.

As school and system leaders in education, how are we preparing our youth to be digital leaders in online environments?

How are we modelling the skills,  aptitudes and behaviours that are appropriate in digital spaces?

Sharing with PQP: Why Do Our Students Need Connected Leaders?

Recently, I was asked to share my thinking with PQP candidates about why connecting as leaders is so important.

I wrote about this late last year, and I have presented workshops on the topic a few times.  

This time I needed to be able to share my thinking remotely, so I created this very quick, one-take talk on why I think that being a connected leader is critical.

How does a busy leader become connected? #OSSEMOOC takes you through “getting connected” in 10 minutes a day here.  (Scroll down and check out the right side of the page for 30 days of learning).

 

 

Why Do [Our Students] Need Connected Leaders?

This month, most of my writing time has been spent on a daily blog for OSSEMOOC, the project I co-lead with Mark Carbone in our current roles with OSAPAC in Ontario.

We say that “connected learners need connected leaders”.

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We work every single day trying to convince education leaders in Ontario that they need to become proficient in digital spaces and they need to become connected learners.

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Image shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike License by Justice Beitzel.

Why do we say this?  Why are we so passionate about this work?

Why do we need educators to be connected leaders?

1.  Innovation isn’t cultivated through isolation.

Participating in open networks gives ideas opportunities to spread.  “Crowd Accelerated Innovation” is a concept explained by Chris Anderson in this TED Talk.  If we want to build innovative schools and systems in education, our leaders must be connected to the best ideas.

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2. Digital citizenship is not something to be taught in isolation as a “subject”.

Digital citizenship is a way of being, to be integrated into all that we do (@TanyaAvrith).

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Digital citizenship is part of who we are, and education leaders need an established positive digital footprint to fully understand this, and to embrace the digital world our students exist in.

3Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 7.55.10 PMIf you don’t understand the digital environment, you are becoming illiterate.  Doug Belshaw explains the essential elements of digital literacies in his TEDxTalk.

4.  Our learning community exists in BOTH physical and digital spaces.

This quote from Dr. John Malloy, currently the Director of Education for HWDSB, reminds us of the critical importance of choosing leaders with the capacity to make great decisions about student learning in both physical and digital spaces:

Using technology is no longer an option for us.  We must support our students to succeed in our physical and digital world.  

Students who do not have this opportunity to learn in the digital world will be disadvantaged, something that we cannot accept.”

UPDATE: Our learners, our audience and our community are in online spaces.  We need to be where they are.

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5. “Isolation is inconsistent with professional practice“.

Catherine Montreuil, Director of Education, BGCDSB, August 2014

(Update: Catherine Montreuil is now the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education, Learning and Curriculum – July 2015)

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We can’t just “close the door and teach” any more.  The smartest
person in the room is the room, unless someone in the room is a connected leader, and then it’s the world.  We need leaders who bring the world to their schools and districts.

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6. Connected learning must be modelled at all levels.

Today, it’s no longer about content.  It’s about networks.  Leaders need to model networked learning for teachers and students.  Connected leaders demonstrate that networking is a priority. We need to show our students what our learning looks like.  We need to demonstrate to teachers how we learn.  We need to share our thinking, leave it open to conversations, and let it be questioned.

7. As leaders, our professional portfolios should be ePortfolios, online where we can model this practice for others, and demonstrating how our work aligns with the Leadership Framework.  George Couros has written about this extensively.

8. We have a moral imperative to share.

Sometimes, leaders are very fortunate to be able to travel to a learning event such as a conference.  All that learning needs to be shared!

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 10.15.44 PMLive-tweeting at the event is a great start, but why shouldn’t everyone could benefit from your learning?  When you share the learning on your blog, it becomes searchable to everyone.  Educators from around the world now have free access to that learning.

If nobody shares, nobody learns!  Put Open and Access at the centre of your learning.

9.  As a connected leader, you bring a world of learning to your practice.

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If leaders aren’t learning online, how can they make good decisions around what technology to purchase with public funds, and what learning is required so the teachers can make effective use of technology for deep learning in their classrooms?

From the blog
From the blog “Principally Speaking”. Click on the image for the link.

Leaders must be participating in “deep learning” so they can understand what that learning looks like, and they can make valid, essential decisions about how to spend funds and time that are critical to moving learning forward.

Update: If leaders do not understand how technology can enable their learning to become a seamless part of their daily lives, they will not understand the importance of their students’ access to the tools for learning.

If you are not a connected leader, there is no better time to start!  OSSEMOOC shows you how in 10 minutes a day.

Update: 10. The End Game Keeps Changing: What’s an Education Worth Having in 2015?

Getting better at old strategies won’t work.  An education worth having in 2015 is not the same as an education worth having in 2000.  If the world is changing faster than the school system, the school system is doing an excellent job of moving toward irrelevance.

Here is some further thinking on this idea: https://fryed.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/whats-an-education-thats-worth-having/

Update: 11: Connected Leaders Drive Student Achievement

Student achievement is impacted by connected leadership.  The connections are explained here.

Resources:

Social Media Trends – September 2015

A Wake Up Call for School Leaders: Eric Sheninger

Digital Literacies (Connected Principals)

Innovation and Intellectual Collisions – Bill Ferriter

5 Reasons why Your Portfolio Should be a Blog – George Couros

A Rich Seam – Michael Fullan

The Power of Professional Capital – Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan

Exploring Digital Literacy and the Importance of Confidence

 

Part of my current role in Ontario is working with teachers and education leaders to dig into what modern learning really looks like at the level of the “student desk”.

Much of the work in this province is informed by the thinking of Michael Fullan, particularly in his latest publications “Great to Excellent: Launching the Next Stage of Ontario’s Education Agenda“, and  “A Rich Seam: How New Pedagogies Find Deep Learning“.

Fullan’s “Six C’s” (for 21st Century skills) are frequently at the centre of such conversations.

Fullan's "6 C's", explained more fully. (From "A Rich Seam" - http://www.michaelfullan.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/3897.Rich_Seam_web.pdf)
Fullan’s “6 C’s”, explained more fully. (From “A Rich Seam” – http://www.michaelfullan.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/3897.Rich_Seam_web.pdf)

 

Fullan, of course, isn’t the first person to consider the skills needed for today’s world.  Doug Belshaw has spent many years studying and crowd-sourcing his ideas around what digital literacies look like.

 

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The 8 Elements of Digital Literacies, from “The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies”, http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/the-essential-elements-of-digital-literacies

 

Certainly the two groups of “C’s” represent slightly different purposes, but the overlap is obvious, and both inform our thinking about what learning needs to look like in today’s world.

Doug Belshaw: The importance of Confidence as a Digital Literacy component (click the image to link to the source).
Doug Belshaw: The importance of Confidence as a Digital Literacy component (click the image to link to the source).

 

My experience tells me that “Confidence” is a critical aspect of our work as we consider how learning needs to change.  A lack of confidence can be a prohibitive barrier to success in today’s digital spaces.

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Many educators express fear in making their thinking visible through blogging or ePortfolios because others will be critical, or perhaps even reprimand them for thinking differently.  Students, unfortunately, sometimes need to overcome the fear of past experiences to progress in particular subject areas.

Teachers need to feel confident in using new tools to engage learners and redefine what learning looks like in the classroom.

How are we creating the conditions in our classrooms, schools and systems so that all of our learners can develop the confidence they need to participate in, model and facilitate deep learning for everyone?

Further Resources:

Doug Belshaw: Digital Literacies and Web Literacies

Doug Belshaw: The 8 C’s of Digital Literacy

Lyn Hilt on Connected Principals: What is Digital Literacy?

SAMR Model Resources (Kathy Schrock)

 

Credits:

“Confidence” Photo Credit: glsims99 via Compfight cc