Tag Archives: digital

Cell Phones

Do you feel it now?

There have been so many predictions about the increasing pace of change, the volatility and uncertainty in exponential times, and  the ambiguity in how to make good decisions.

It’s been a year since Canada’s Digital Talent Strategy was released. It’s a very different time now than it was in March 2016, and we are now only 2 years away from being short 182000 workers in this country in the digital economy.

Look carefully at your current grade 10 students, because this will be their world on high school graduation day:

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From the executive summary. Image links to original document.

So what is the urgent learning need in our schools?

 

Meanwhile, we have schools banning “cell phones” because they are a “distraction” from learning.

Or could we rephrase this as schools banning “powerful pocket computers” that give students access to the best teachers in the world?

When students are “distracted” by “cell phones”, what is the urgent learning need of the child?

We need to ask ourselves questions like:

When have we scaffolded the development of self-regulation with mobile devices?

When have we empowered students by showing them how to connect with experts from around the world?

How have we created the conditions for classroom learning to be relevant (an end game that changes rapidly)?

How have we prepared students for 2017 by teaching them the essential digital life skills they need, to use a powerful pocket computer to learn, to connect globally, to solve adaptive challenges with others, and to acquire the life skills needed to thrive in 2017 and beyond?

Or we could just take those powerful computers away from them so they don’t get distracted.

 

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Featured image by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

This post is part of a #5post5days challenge issued by Carlo Fusco. Please take time to read the other blogs, and join in! Five posts in five days is not the same as one per day, and you can start any time! 1/5 posts available here. 2/5 posts available here.  3/5 posts can be viewed here.

What other words in education to we need to rethink the definition of?

1. School

2. Blended Learning

3. eLearning

4. Cell Phones

5. Student Success

Check out the other Day 4 Posts from #5posts5days here:

Carlo Fusco: Doing Away With Subjects

Jessica Weber:  Voyageurs of Learning

Resources:

The Star

 

Where Truth Gets Eyeballs

We all know carbon dating has been disproven.  Homosexuality is a choice.  Climate change is a hoax. Hillary is a criminal. Everyone should carry a gun for protection.

All of these statements have been treated as facts in the media over the past few weeks, in preparation for USA to go to the polls.

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And many people fully believe them to be true.

“People have difficulty now just sorting out what is true and what is not, and if you don’t have some common baseline of facts… it’s very hard to figure out how we move the democracy forward.”

US President Barack Obama

in conversation with Bill Maher

If we don’t have a common understanding of the facts, how do we have a national conversation about policy?

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President Obama goes on to say that the filters on the information getting to the people are very challenging to overcome.  News sources report untrue information that people believe.  People don’t think critically about the information delivered to them through AM Talk Radio, Fox News, Facebook, “Reality” TV…

Confirmation bias has people making decisions then looking for the statements in any media to confirm their beliefs.

 

In Canada, what questions are we asking about our media?

During our last national election, some of our largest newspapers used their front pages for partisan politics to influence voters.

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Canadaland with Jesse Brown explores the state of media in Canada on the regular podcast.

In Ontario schools,  while we are concerned about the ability of our students to make up an article for traditional print media, how do we also ensure that they know how to critically examine media and ask questions to separate fact from belief?

 

If ever there was a time for educators to make digital literacies, including critical thinking, a priority, today is it.

Canada needs critical thinkers who make evidence-informed decisions.  We need citizens who know how to  keep their eyeballs, their heads, and their hearts on the truth, no matter what filters are on the media that they tune into.

We need citizens who stand up to the indoctrination of children and the perpetuation of false information.

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Canada flag image shared by Brandon Grasley CC-BY-2.0

Featured image (Where’s my eyeball?) shared by Alan Levine CC BY 2.0

Resources:

Literacy Toolkit for a Post-Truth World

OSAPAC Resource for School Leaders

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OSAPAC Resources for Digital Citizenship: Critical Thinking and Information Literacy

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The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies by Doug Belshaw

Tech Gypsies Episode 31 

The Digital Networked Lives of Our Children – #picsymposia2016

Today in Thunder Bay, close to 60 parents gave up their Saturday to learn about parent leadership in our education system.

The Ministry of Education sponsored event was an opportunity for parents to learn all about what is important in education and how to access funds to share knowledge in their boards.

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I was so impressed with the dedication to improving the education in the classrooms in their boards.  What rich discussion in the room!

 

Below are the slides I presented on the digital networked lives of children.  Please contact me if you have questions about the presentation.

Thank you to colleagues who shared work for this slide show:

Alec Couros

George Couros

Lisa Neale

Doug Belshaw

Aviva Dunsiger

Jamie Reaburn Weir

Tim Robinson

Canadian Education Association

Scott McLeod

Cathy Montreuil

Alan Levine

Stacey Wallwin

Karen Enders

Darla Myers

Steven Wilson

Tina Zita

Silvana Hoxha

Mark W. Carbone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Resources for #onted: Becoming a Digital Leader

You’ve decided to self-direct your professional learning on Twitter.  Your students want a class Facebook page.  Your school board is implementing a BYOD policy.

Where can you go to ensure you and your students will thrive in online environments?

OSAPAC has led the creation of three series of resources for Ontario educators.

  1. Digital Citizenship and Leadership for classrooms
  2. What Principals Want to Know about Digital Leadership
  3. OSSEMOOC – a community of leaders supporting each other in getting connected.

 

  1. Digital Citizenship and Leadership for the Classroom

Recently, Ontario educators identified the need for resources for teaching the various aspects of Digital Citizenship.  When OSAPAC looked for a suitable product, it was decided that a living resource was most appropriate.  Ontario educators curated suitable resources for Ontario students by organizing them by division and topic.  Then, they wrote classroom connections for teachers.

The full, open, living resource can be found here.

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Images shared by OSAPAC.ca under a CC-BY-NC-2.0 license
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Images shared by OSAPAC.ca under a CC-BY-NC-2.0 license
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Images shared by OSAPAC.ca under a CC-BY-NC-2.0 license
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Images shared by OSAPAC.ca under a CC-BY-NC-2.0 license

 

Educators choose a category and a division, and are then provided with a list of appropriate resources.

For example, Critical Thinking, Junior Division

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As well, many classroom connections have been written to guide educators in using resources.

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2. What Principals Want to Know About Digital Leadership: School Leader Learning Series

Ontario Principals have written a set of resources for their colleagues who are learning to use and to lead the use of technology to enhance learning.

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3. Ontario School & System Leaders Educational Technology MOOC (Massive Open Online Community) 

OSSEMOOC was created to scaffold and support school and system leaders in their personal self-directed professional learning about how to leverage technology to enhance and enrich student learning.

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The open (no password required, no sign up required) site has a content area where information is shared about events (live chats, Twitter chats, livestreaming conferences, GHO on air, blog hops, collaborative projects, book studies, etc.).

Blogs written by school and system leaders and aspiring leaders are linked to the site.

Courses on how to use social media are run regularly, and can also be completely self-directed.

Links to other OSSEMOOC social media are on the site as well as our 30 days to get connected in 10 minutes per day program.

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Be sure to access these free, open, no password required resources.

Contact ossemooc at gmail dot com for more information on free personal support services for education leaders.

#OSSEMOOC

Feature image by OSAPAC.ca, under a CC-BY-NC-SA-2.0 licence.