Tag Archives: Tina Zita

We Need You to Lead Us 1/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina! 


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We Need You to Lead Us

This subtitle from Seth Godin’s book, Tribes, is a call to action to all of us. In a rapidly changing world, we can no longer be complacent. Everyone has a voice, and a platform for spreading ideas that work.

How will the voices for good be the ones that rise to the top?

As an information junkie, who can easily spend a lot of time reading each day, I do need a push to share what I am learning.  It is so simple to fall into the traps that prevent sharing:

No time – it’s easier to keep reading than to stop, reflect and share.

Reflecting, sharing, and documenting learning are all essential parts of learning. Doing this openly invites conversation, helps others reflect further, and spreads ideas.

It isn’t perfect – in a few more days I will really be able to craft something better.

We hold on to the belief that we can’t “put it out there” until it’s perfect. George Couros often refers to having a place to do your thinking, and another place for your best work. Getting ideas out there helps  invites others to help shape your ideas. You can write even more perfectly about them once they have had the chance to bounce around in your PLN for awhile.

It’s too short – I’ll wait until I have a bit more.

Readers will thank you for “short” posts. It’s all they have time to read anyway! Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter – they thrive on our need for small pieces of information.

I really did need someone to lead me, to nudge me to get through the excuses for not sharing, and to push me to do what I believe, to consistently and reliably document and share what I am learning, to read the work of others and to be a participant in the evolving ideas of those in my PLN.

Thank you, Tina Zita, for modelling the importance of being a leader in 2017.

Won’t you join this 10 posts in 10 days challenge?

Enabling Educators to be Learners: 1/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina!

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How can we enable our colleagues to access the rich professional learning opportunities available online?

 

We want to own our own learning.

We want to self-direct our learning.

In 2016, it has never been easier to do this.  The abundance of open, accessible resources is overwhelming.  Learning to manage and organize the information is a new competency.  Learning to reflect, to share, to find, to converse, to connect, to adapt – we are doing this.

Or are we?

We all know colleagues who don’t participate in learning in digital spaces.

For those who provide learning opportunities online, the sphere of influence has a definite, distinct boundary.  They cannot reach the individual who does not engage in digital spaces.

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In the same way, it doesn’t matter how rich, how engaging, how simple to use or how valuable online learning is for educators  if they don’t know where to look for it or how to use the tools that will allow them to access it.

I think that we have done very well in providing digital resources and learning opportunities for teachers.

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Thanks to Julie Balen for collating this year’s #ontwordont

How, now, can we work to enable the educators who still do not access the rich professional learning environment online?

As someone who self-directs their own professional learning online, how can you help one colleague this month to see some value in engaging in online learning or using online resources?

Leverage your PLN to ask for help.  What is the best starting point for one colleague? What can you show them that will help them see the value in engaging in online, self-directed professional learning?

Resources:

OSSEMOOC

Twitter for Absolute Beginners

Leveraging Twitter for Rich Professional Learning

Ontario Edublogs

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Challenging the Status Quo (Safely)

At the end of #YRDSBQuest, Michael Fullan told the educators in attendance that they need to go back and challenge the status quo.

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I am documenting the ongoing conversation about how to do this safely.

We rarely talk about it, but in our work, many educators have told us they won’t blog because they are afraid it will show others “what they don’t know”.  They see leaders in education as people who will label them as being inappropriate for leadership roles.

We talk a lot about how we want a growth mindset for our students, yet conversations with aspiring leaders demonstrate that challenging leaders can result in a label – “not moving up in this organization”.

How do we build a system that values challenge to the status quo? How do we challenge the status quo without jeopardizing our careers in the current environment?

Below is the conversation currently developing.  Please add to the conversation and help push our thinking about how we can best effect change – how those wanting to challenge can do so effectively.

You can continue to follow the tweet replies here.  We encourage you to also join the conversation by commenting on the blog.

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In addition, Seth Godin shared this post on his blog this morning:

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Shared by Seth Godin on his blog here: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2015/11/a-reason-persuasion-is-surprisingly-difficult.html